South Georgia Continued
Some of the adult King Penguins were molting. This is a very challenging period for these penguins. They can not
enter the water when they are molting and must starve for the molting period. The growth of a new set of feathers is
very demanding on their bodies and causes them to undergo a major weight loss.
There are many fur seals on South Georgia. This was mating season, so we were charged by several male seals. Out
of the water their sight is not very good, and they confuse us as competition for the harem.
On the morning of December 5, we visited Grytiken. For over fifty years Grytiken was the center of whaling in the
South Atlantic. It is also where Shackleton was buried (below left).
In addition to the rusting whaling station,
Grytiken has one of the most southernly
churches in the world. No one lives
permanently on South Georgia. South
Georgia belongs to the Falklands. It earns a
good income from the fishing rights and has
two substantial patrol ships to enforce its
fishing rights.

Note the elephant seals in the forefront of
the picture below.
Right. Two molting elephant
seals. While they molt, they lose
some of their protection against
the cold waters and must stay
ashore.

South Georgia is below the
convergence zone. For many,
the convergence zone defines
the boundaries of Antarctica as
the water and air temperature
drop abruptly when you cross the
convergence. Curiously, cold
water is richer in sea life than
warm water.
Arctic Tern (above,
right and below).